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Posts Tagged ‘Being an informed citizen’

One of the topics of conversation between me and my colleagues recently has been the much-talked of proliferation of fake news stories this election cycle and the difficulty students (and adults) have telling fictional stories and real stories apart. Most recently, you may have read about a 12-state survey conducted by Stanford’s Graduate School of Education that found that students on all levels (college, high school, and middle schoool) displayed an unfortunate lack of ability to distinguish between true and false sources. [If you would like to read more about the study, click here for an executive summary].

The solution, the study concluded, was to teach students to evaluate sources like fact checkers would. For a list of tips on spotting fake news, check out this post from Factcheckers.org. As the post highlights, part of the problem is that fake news is now more sophisticated that the viral e-mails of 2008. Also great fact checking sites: Snopes.com and Politifact.com.

Librarians aren’t immune from fake news syndrome either and, as I’ve discovered, it can be difficult to track down quotes even from relatively well-known sources. For example, here’s a quote that I struggled to place:

thorin-death-scene-quote

Should be easy to find a quote from a famous actor about a movie [The Hobbit: Battle of the Five Armies] that he’s promoting, right? Think again. I hunted all over the ‘Net before I discovered that the source of the quote was an Empire magazine podcast. The quote itself appears at the 52:38 minute mark, almost at the very end of the podcast.

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